thekhooll:

Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion Robert M. Gurney
thekhooll:

Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion Robert M. Gurney
thekhooll:

Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion Robert M. Gurney
thekhooll:

Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion Robert M. Gurney
thekhooll:

Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion Robert M. Gurney
thekhooll:

Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion Robert M. Gurney
thekhooll:

Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion Robert M. Gurney
exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold  exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold 

exhibition-ism:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold 

asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.
asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon
The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.

asylum-art:

The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon

The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

A Towering Figure Enclosed Within a Glass Greenhouse by Susanne Ussing
Susanne Ussing, ‘I Drivhuset’ (‘In the Greenhouse’), 1980. Ussing was a Danish artist and architect, with a special interest ceramics. This mixed-media piece brings together the world of sculpture and architecture by placing the former inside the latter. Classical parallels are easily conjured here. Like a latter-day (and feminine) Zeus at Olympia, this ginormous female figure is too large for the confines of the glasshouse, which looks like it might shatter were she to move too freely; like a Crouching Aphrodite of immodest proportions, she looks vulnerable and coquettish all at once. At the same time, her skin of newspapers and skeleton of metal and wood thoroughly modern - not quite distracting from the gracefulness of her pose, but instead under-girding her with firm foundations.


Susanne Ussing (1940-1998, Danish) - I Drivhuset installed at Ordrupgaardsamlingen (In the Glasshouse), Denmark, 1980. It is composed of granite and porous materials.

asylum-art:

A Towering Figure Enclosed Within a Glass Greenhouse by Susanne Ussing

Susanne Ussing, ‘I Drivhuset’ (‘In the Greenhouse’), 1980. Ussing was a Danish artist and architect, with a special interest ceramics. This mixed-media piece brings together the world of sculpture and architecture by placing the former inside the latter. Classical parallels are easily conjured here. Like a latter-day (and feminine) Zeus at Olympia, this ginormous female figure is too large for the confines of the glasshouse, which looks like it might shatter were she to move too freely; like a Crouching Aphrodite of immodest proportions, she looks vulnerable and coquettish all at once. At the same time, her skin of newspapers and skeleton of metal and wood thoroughly modern - not quite distracting from the gracefulness of her pose, but instead under-girding her with firm foundations.

Susanne Ussing (1940-1998, Danish) - I Drivhuset installed at Ordrupgaardsamlingen (In the Glasshouse), Denmark, 1980. It is composed of granite and porous materials.

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig
Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Dark & Delightful Work Artist: Bernardi Roig

Bernardí Roig is an artist from Mallorca, Spain who explores concepts of loneliness, death, and immortality with his surreal light sculptures.

(via asylum-art)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.
Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Meat –(NSFW) The impressive works of russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov.

Dimitri Tsykalov isn’t afraid to push the boundaries, as this series of photos attests. Draping nude figures in meat shaped like weapons of war, he creates an aggressive, barbaric atmosphere. The blood lust of these soldiers is reflected by the dripping meat that’s hanging off of them like armor.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.




asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo
When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.
His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.
Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.

asylum-art:

Arhitectural Hand Drawings by  Rafael Araujo

When it comes to architectural drawings, computer-aided design software is being used  and due to this, hand-drawn art seems to begin to lose.  The venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo show us that no matter how impressive the technology, nothing can match the expressiveness of hand-drawings.

His series of architectural style drawings entitled ‘Calculation’ are done with pencil and pen and seem to try to give an answer to the question “Is the Universe actually made of math?”. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where he renders the motion and mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. The trajectories of a butterfly fly or the logarithmic spirals of shells are beautifully illustrated by Araujo, who`s remarkable skills seem to resurrect the art of hand-drawing.

Araujo`s illustrations appear to be drawn from Da Vinci’s sketchbooks,  showing us that our reality isn`t just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials. asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by Brian Dettmer
Brian Dettmer is an American contemporary artist famous for utilizing old products in his sculptures. He has recently been doing a lot with books, but early on used records and glass. In his 2006 collection he uses cassette tapes to create a musical skeleton. He keeps the words legible, twisting and altering the tapes to accept his form. The cassettes are all white with black text, and when melted can be shaped like clay. He has two skulls with specific genres of tapes on them: Women of Pop and 80’s Metal. His full skeleton is formed with tapes like The Police, The Knack, and a few best of editions. To Dettmer, the skeletons represent a people who cannot live without music. The cassette skeletons show an extreme understanding of bone structure and exemplify his great ability to shift materials.

asylum-art:

asylum-art:

Dead Cassette Tapes Reincarnated As Skeletons by
Brian Dettmer

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Artist Cuts a Meditative Fortress of Paper Strips

Japanese artist Sachiko Abe cuts fine strips of paper for hours on end in her performance series titled Cut Papers. Having first discovered the calming effects of shredding paper over 15 years ago while admitted at an insane asylum, the artist now explores the act’s meditative properties as an art form. Abe most recently performed Cut Papers #13 this year at the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island. Encircling herself in a fortress of tattered slivers of white paper, Abe says, “The act of cutting is a constant exercise through which I organize and structure my random thoughts.” It is through the repetitive, time-consuming process that the artist finds a peaceful state of mind. She goes on to say, “The rhythm of the scissors, the fineness and the length of the paper strip correspond to the process of my thinking, and its effect to the body. While essentially personal, Cut Papers is a necessary practice for me to formulate my relationship to the external world. 

"The act defines and redefines the boundary between the self and the other, and helps to recover a meaningful relationship with one another. Complete silence and neutral white space allow the audience to focus purely on the sound of scissors and slight movement of the cut papers. The closed environment also invites the viewer to synchronize with the tide of emotion and contemplation created by the performance."

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Artist Cuts a Meditative Fortress of Paper Strips

Japanese artist Sachiko Abe cuts fine strips of paper for hours on end in her performance series titled Cut Papers. Having first discovered the calming effects of shredding paper over 15 years ago while admitted at an insane asylum, the artist now explores the act’s meditative properties as an art form. Abe most recently performed Cut Papers #13 this year at the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island. Encircling herself in a fortress of tattered slivers of white paper, Abe says, “The act of cutting is a constant exercise through which I organize and structure my random thoughts.” It is through the repetitive, time-consuming process that the artist finds a peaceful state of mind. She goes on to say, “The rhythm of the scissors, the fineness and the length of the paper strip correspond to the process of my thinking, and its effect to the body. While essentially personal, Cut Papers is a necessary practice for me to formulate my relationship to the external world. 

"The act defines and redefines the boundary between the self and the other, and helps to recover a meaningful relationship with one another. Complete silence and neutral white space allow the audience to focus purely on the sound of scissors and slight movement of the cut papers. The closed environment also invites the viewer to synchronize with the tide of emotion and contemplation created by the performance."

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Artist Cuts a Meditative Fortress of Paper Strips

Japanese artist Sachiko Abe cuts fine strips of paper for hours on end in her performance series titled Cut Papers. Having first discovered the calming effects of shredding paper over 15 years ago while admitted at an insane asylum, the artist now explores the act’s meditative properties as an art form. Abe most recently performed Cut Papers #13 this year at the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island. Encircling herself in a fortress of tattered slivers of white paper, Abe says, “The act of cutting is a constant exercise through which I organize and structure my random thoughts.” It is through the repetitive, time-consuming process that the artist finds a peaceful state of mind. She goes on to say, “The rhythm of the scissors, the fineness and the length of the paper strip correspond to the process of my thinking, and its effect to the body. While essentially personal, Cut Papers is a necessary practice for me to formulate my relationship to the external world. 

"The act defines and redefines the boundary between the self and the other, and helps to recover a meaningful relationship with one another. Complete silence and neutral white space allow the audience to focus purely on the sound of scissors and slight movement of the cut papers. The closed environment also invites the viewer to synchronize with the tide of emotion and contemplation created by the performance."

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Artist Cuts a Meditative Fortress of Paper Strips

Japanese artist Sachiko Abe cuts fine strips of paper for hours on end in her performance series titled Cut Papers. Having first discovered the calming effects of shredding paper over 15 years ago while admitted at an insane asylum, the artist now explores the act’s meditative properties as an art form. Abe most recently performed Cut Papers #13 this year at the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island. Encircling herself in a fortress of tattered slivers of white paper, Abe says, “The act of cutting is a constant exercise through which I organize and structure my random thoughts.” It is through the repetitive, time-consuming process that the artist finds a peaceful state of mind. She goes on to say, “The rhythm of the scissors, the fineness and the length of the paper strip correspond to the process of my thinking, and its effect to the body. While essentially personal, Cut Papers is a necessary practice for me to formulate my relationship to the external world. 

"The act defines and redefines the boundary between the self and the other, and helps to recover a meaningful relationship with one another. Complete silence and neutral white space allow the audience to focus purely on the sound of scissors and slight movement of the cut papers. The closed environment also invites the viewer to synchronize with the tide of emotion and contemplation created by the performance."

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Artist Cuts a Meditative Fortress of Paper Strips

Japanese artist Sachiko Abe cuts fine strips of paper for hours on end in her performance series titled Cut Papers. Having first discovered the calming effects of shredding paper over 15 years ago while admitted at an insane asylum, the artist now explores the act’s meditative properties as an art form. Abe most recently performed Cut Papers #13 this year at the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island. Encircling herself in a fortress of tattered slivers of white paper, Abe says, “The act of cutting is a constant exercise through which I organize and structure my random thoughts.” It is through the repetitive, time-consuming process that the artist finds a peaceful state of mind. She goes on to say, “The rhythm of the scissors, the fineness and the length of the paper strip correspond to the process of my thinking, and its effect to the body. While essentially personal, Cut Papers is a necessary practice for me to formulate my relationship to the external world. 

"The act defines and redefines the boundary between the self and the other, and helps to recover a meaningful relationship with one another. Complete silence and neutral white space allow the audience to focus purely on the sound of scissors and slight movement of the cut papers. The closed environment also invites the viewer to synchronize with the tide of emotion and contemplation created by the performance."

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Artist Cuts a Meditative Fortress of Paper Strips

Japanese artist Sachiko Abe cuts fine strips of paper for hours on end in her performance series titled Cut Papers. Having first discovered the calming effects of shredding paper over 15 years ago while admitted at an insane asylum, the artist now explores the act’s meditative properties as an art form. Abe most recently performed Cut Papers #13 this year at the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island. Encircling herself in a fortress of tattered slivers of white paper, Abe says, “The act of cutting is a constant exercise through which I organize and structure my random thoughts.” It is through the repetitive, time-consuming process that the artist finds a peaceful state of mind. She goes on to say, “The rhythm of the scissors, the fineness and the length of the paper strip correspond to the process of my thinking, and its effect to the body. While essentially personal, Cut Papers is a necessary practice for me to formulate my relationship to the external world. 

"The act defines and redefines the boundary between the self and the other, and helps to recover a meaningful relationship with one another. Complete silence and neutral white space allow the audience to focus purely on the sound of scissors and slight movement of the cut papers. The closed environment also invites the viewer to synchronize with the tide of emotion and contemplation created by the performance."

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Artist Cuts a Meditative Fortress of Paper Strips

Japanese artist Sachiko Abe cuts fine strips of paper for hours on end in her performance series titled Cut Papers. Having first discovered the calming effects of shredding paper over 15 years ago while admitted at an insane asylum, the artist now explores the act’s meditative properties as an art form. Abe most recently performed Cut Papers #13 this year at the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island. Encircling herself in a fortress of tattered slivers of white paper, Abe says, “The act of cutting is a constant exercise through which I organize and structure my random thoughts.” It is through the repetitive, time-consuming process that the artist finds a peaceful state of mind. She goes on to say, “The rhythm of the scissors, the fineness and the length of the paper strip correspond to the process of my thinking, and its effect to the body. While essentially personal, Cut Papers is a necessary practice for me to formulate my relationship to the external world. 

"The act defines and redefines the boundary between the self and the other, and helps to recover a meaningful relationship with one another. Complete silence and neutral white space allow the audience to focus purely on the sound of scissors and slight movement of the cut papers. The closed environment also invites the viewer to synchronize with the tide of emotion and contemplation created by the performance."

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Artist Cuts a Meditative Fortress of Paper Strips

Japanese artist Sachiko Abe cuts fine strips of paper for hours on end in her performance series titled Cut Papers. Having first discovered the calming effects of shredding paper over 15 years ago while admitted at an insane asylum, the artist now explores the act’s meditative properties as an art form. Abe most recently performed Cut Papers #13 this year at the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island.

Encircling herself in a fortress of tattered slivers of white paper, Abe says, “The act of cutting is a constant exercise through which I organize and structure my random thoughts.” It is through the repetitive, time-consuming process that the artist finds a peaceful state of mind. She goes on to say, “The rhythm of the scissors, the fineness and the length of the paper strip correspond to the process of my thinking, and its effect to the body. While essentially personal, Cut Papers is a necessary practice for me to formulate my relationship to the external world. 
"The act defines and redefines the boundary between the self and the other, and helps to recover a meaningful relationship with one another. Complete silence and neutral white space allow the audience to focus purely on the sound of scissors and slight movement of the cut papers. The closed environment also invites the viewer to synchronize with the tide of emotion and contemplation created by the performance."

(via asylum-art)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Mosse
Madonna and Child, North Kivu, Eastern Congo
2012
Digital C print
35 x 28 inches

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings
on Facebook
What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.
“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.





watch the video:

asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings

on Facebook

What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.

“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.


watch the video:

(via asylum-art)